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Riverbed

20.8.2014 - 11.1.2015
Louisiana, Humlebæk, Denmark. 

Materials: water, blue basalt, basalt, lava, stone, wood, steel, foil, hose, pumps, cooling unit. 

Riverbed

20.8.2014 - 11.1.2015
Louisiana, Humlebæk, Denmark. 

Materials: water, blue basalt, basalt, lava, stone, wood, steel, foil, hose, pumps, cooling unit. 

Cirkelbroen

2015 
Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Dimensions: 25 x 19,6 x 39,3 m. 

Circular platforms topped by tall masts make up a bridge for pedestrians and cyclists that spans Copenhagen’s Christianshavns Kanal. Thin steel cables extend from the top of the masts – the highest of which rises up twenty-five metres – to the platform’s circular railings. Accessible via ramps at each end, the five steel platforms vary in diameter from ten to fourteen metres and are arranged to create a staggered, zigzag path that inspires uncertainty and pause. 
Cirkelbroen is lit at night, and one section rotates to allow large boats to pass into and out of the canal.

Cirkelbroen

2015 
Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Dimensions: 25 x 19,6 x 39,3 m. 

Circular platforms topped by tall masts make up a bridge for pedestrians and cyclists that spans Copenhagen’s Christianshavns Kanal. Thin steel cables extend from the top of the masts – the highest of which rises up twenty-five metres – to the platform’s circular railings. Accessible via ramps at each end, the five steel platforms vary in diameter from ten to fourteen metres and are arranged to create a staggered, zigzag path that inspires uncertainty and pause. 
Cirkelbroen is lit at night, and one section rotates to allow large boats to pass into and out of the canal.

Cirkelbroen

2015 
Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Dimensions: 25 x 19,6 x 39,3 m. 

Circular platforms topped by tall masts make up a bridge for pedestrians and cyclists that spans Copenhagen’s Christianshavns Kanal. Thin steel cables extend from the top of the masts – the highest of which rises up twenty-five metres – to the platform’s circular railings. Accessible via ramps at each end, the five steel platforms vary in diameter from ten to fourteen metres and are arranged to create a staggered, zigzag path that inspires uncertainty and pause. 
Cirkelbroen is lit at night, and one section rotates to allow large boats to pass into and out of the canal.

Fog Assembly

2016
Versailles, France.

Materials: steel, water, nozzles, pump system
Dimensions: 4.5 m, ø 29 m 

An ephemeral work that changes in appearance according to the qualities of the sunlight and the wind, Fog assembly produces a continual outpouring of swirling mist that dissolves the boundaries and outlines of the objects it encounters. This lively cloud, emitted from a vast ring positioned several metres above the grassy lawn of the pentagonal Bosquet de l’Etoile, invites visitor’s active engagement and participation.

Fog Assembly

2016
Versailles, France.

Materials: steel, water, nozzles, pump system
Dimensions: 4.5 m, ø 29 m 

An ephemeral work that changes in appearance according to the qualities of the sunlight and the wind, Fog assembly produces a continual outpouring of swirling mist that dissolves the boundaries and outlines of the objects it encounters. This lively cloud, emitted from a vast ring positioned several metres above the grassy lawn of the pentagonal Bosquet de l’Etoile, invites visitor’s active engagement and participation.

Fog Assembly

2016
Versailles, France.

Materials: steel, water, nozzles, pump system
Dimensions: 4.5 m, ø 29 m 

An ephemeral work that changes in appearance according to the qualities of the sunlight and the wind, Fog assembly produces a continual outpouring of swirling mist that dissolves the boundaries and outlines of the objects it encounters. This lively cloud, emitted from a vast ring positioned several metres above the grassy lawn of the pentagonal Bosquet de l’Etoile, invites visitor’s active engagement and participation.

Glacial Rock Flour Garden

2016
Versailles, France 

Materials: Glacial rock flour

The circular space in the middle of the Bosquet de la Colonnade is filled with a thick layer of moraine – granite that was ground into a fine grey powder over centuries by moving glaciers. The claylike material surrounds the sculpture of Pluto abducting Persephone, the goddess of fertility. The installation is one result of Eliasson’s ongoing dialogue with geologist Minik Rosing, who is developing plans to export moraine from Greenland to tropical and subtropical areas, where it can be used to revitalise the depleted soil, as it is a rich source of the mineral nutrients that sustain crops and other plants.

Glacial Rock Flour Garden

2016
Versailles, France 

Materials: Glacial rock flour

The circular space in the middle of the Bosquet de la Colonnade is filled with a thick layer of moraine – granite that was ground into a fine grey powder over centuries by moving glaciers. The claylike material surrounds the sculpture of Pluto abducting Persephone, the goddess of fertility. The installation is one result of Eliasson’s ongoing dialogue with geologist Minik Rosing, who is developing plans to export moraine from Greenland to tropical and subtropical areas, where it can be used to revitalise the depleted soil, as it is a rich source of the mineral nutrients that sustain crops and other plants.

Glacial Rock Flour Garden

2016
Versailles, France 

Materials: Glacial rock flour

The circular space in the middle of the Bosquet de la Colonnade is filled with a thick layer of moraine – granite that was ground into a fine grey powder over centuries by moving glaciers. The claylike material surrounds the sculpture of Pluto abducting Persephone, the goddess of fertility. The installation is one result of Eliasson’s ongoing dialogue with geologist Minik Rosing, who is developing plans to export moraine from Greenland to tropical and subtropical areas, where it can be used to revitalise the depleted soil, as it is a rich source of the mineral nutrients that sustain crops and other plants.

Waterfall

2016
Versailles, France. 

Materials: Crane, water, stainless steel, pump system, hose, ballast

A tall, narrow waterfall cascades into the basin of the Grand Canal, along the primary visual axis of the Gardens of Versailles. The waterfall is supported by a latticework tower built from yellow steel girders; pumps carry water up through thick black pipes to a platform at the top of the tower, from which it comes crashing down into the canal far below. The visible infrastructure of the waterfall calls attention to the constructed nature of both the work itself and the surrounding gardens, while the tumbling water highlights the presence of larger natural forces that play upon this contrived environment: the strength and direction of the wind, the conditions of the light at a particular moment: the strength and direction of the wind, the conditions of the light at a particular moment.

Waterfall

2016
Versailles, France. 

Materials: Crane, water, stainless steel, pump system, hose, ballast

A tall, narrow waterfall cascades into the basin of the Grand Canal, along the primary visual axis of the Gardens of Versailles. The waterfall is supported by a latticework tower built from yellow steel girders; pumps carry water up through thick black pipes to a platform at the top of the tower, from which it comes crashing down into the canal far below. The visible infrastructure of the waterfall calls attention to the constructed nature of both the work itself and the surrounding gardens, while the tumbling water highlights the presence of larger natural forces that play upon this contrived environment: the strength and direction of the wind, the conditions of the light at a particular moment: the strength and direction of the wind, the conditions of the light at a particular moment.

Waterfall

2016
Versailles, France. 

Materials: Crane, water, stainless steel, pump system, hose, ballast

A tall, narrow waterfall cascades into the basin of the Grand Canal, along the primary visual axis of the Gardens of Versailles. The waterfall is supported by a latticework tower built from yellow steel girders; pumps carry water up through thick black pipes to a platform at the top of the tower, from which it comes crashing down into the canal far below. The visible infrastructure of the waterfall calls attention to the constructed nature of both the work itself and the surrounding gardens, while the tumbling water highlights the presence of larger natural forces that play upon this contrived environment: the strength and direction of the wind, the conditions of the light at a particular moment: the strength and direction of the wind, the conditions of the light at a particular moment.

The Weather Project

2003
Tate Modern, London. 

Dimensions: 26,7 x 22,3 x 155,4 m

Created for the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern, London, this site-specific installation employed a semi-circular screen, a ceiling of mirrors, and artificial mist to create the illusion of a sun. Aluminium frames lined with mirror foil were suspended from the ceiling to create a giant mirror that visually doubled the volume of the hall – along with the semi-circular screen mounted on the far wall, its long edge abutting the mirror ceiling. Backlit by approximately 200 mono-frequency lights, the semi-circle and its reflection created the image of a massive, indoor sunset seen through the artificial mist emitted into the room. By walking to the far end of the hall, visitors could see how the sun was constructed, and the reverse of the mirror structure was visible from the top floor of the museum.

In preparation for the exhibition, Eliasson devised a questionnaire for the employees at Tate Modern that included questions such as: ‘Has a weather phenomenon ever changed the course of your life dramatically?’ ‘Do you think tolerance to other individuals is proportional to the weather?’ ‘To what extent are you aware of the weather outside your workplace?’ The results were published in the catalogue accompanying the exhibition, which also included a roundtable discussion about the communication of art, meteorological reports of freak weather events, weather statistics, and a series of essays on the weather, time, and space.

The Weather Project

2003
Tate Modern, London.

Dimensions: 26,7 x 22,3 x 155,4 m

Created for the Turbine Hall of Tate Modern, London, this site-specific installation employed a semi-circular screen, a ceiling of mirrors, and artificial mist to create the illusion of a sun. Aluminium frames lined with mirror foil were suspended from the ceiling to create a giant mirror that visually doubled the volume of the hall – along with the semi-circular screen mounted on the far wall, its long edge abutting the mirror ceiling. Backlit by approximately 200 mono-frequency lights, the semi-circle and its reflection created the image of a massive, indoor sunset seen through the artificial mist emitted into the room. By walking to the far end of the hall, visitors could see how the sun was constructed, and the reverse of the mirror structure was visible from the top floor of the museum.

In preparation for the exhibition, Eliasson devised a questionnaire for the employees at Tate Modern that included questions such as: ‘Has a weather phenomenon ever changed the course of your life dramatically?’ ‘Do you think tolerance to other individuals is proportional to the weather?’ ‘To what extent are you aware of the weather outside your workplace?’ The results were published in the catalogue accompanying the exhibition, which also included a roundtable discussion about the communication of art, meteorological reports of freak weather events, weather statistics, and a series of essays on the weather, time, and space.

The New York City Waterfalls

2008
New York City, NY.

Materials: Water, scaffolding, steel grill age and throughs, pumps, piping, intake filter pool frames and filter fabric, LED lights, ultra-violet filters, concrete, switch gears, electrical equipment and wiring, control modules and anemometres. 

Commissioned by Public Art Fund, The New York City Waterfalls was a temporary installation, running from mid-July to mid-October 2008. The four Waterfalls were located in the East River, New York, USA: one on the Brooklyn anchorage under Brooklyn Bridge; one between Piers 4 and 5 in Brooklyn; one in Lower Manhattan at Pier 35; and one on Governors Island. The 30-40 m high structures, consisting of scaffolding, pumps, and hoses, were a continuation of Eliasson's previous waterfall works. The New York City Waterfalls were presented by Public Art Fund, in collaboration with the City of New York.

The New York City Waterfalls

2008
New York City, NY.

Materials: Water, scaffolding, steel grill age and throughs, pumps, piping, intake filter pool frames and filter fabric, LED lights, ultra-violet filters, concrete, switch gears, electrical equipment and wiring, control modules and anemometres. 

Commissioned by Public Art Fund, The New York City Waterfalls was a temporary installation, running from mid-July to mid-October 2008. The four Waterfalls were located in the East River, New York, USA: one on the Brooklyn anchorage under Brooklyn Bridge; one between Piers 4 and 5 in Brooklyn; one in Lower Manhattan at Pier 35; and one on Governors Island. The 30-40 m high structures, consisting of scaffolding, pumps, and hoses, were a continuation of Eliasson's previous waterfall works. The New York City Waterfalls were presented by Public Art Fund, in collaboration with the City of New York.

Green Light

2016
Vienna, Austria. 

Materials: Wood (European ash), recycled yogurt cups (PLA), used plastic bags, recycled nylon, LED (green)

"Green light is an act of welcoming, addressed both to those who have fled hardship and instability in their home countries and to the residents of Vienna. Working together in a playful creative process, participants build a modular light and construct a communal environment in which difference is not only accepted but embraced. I hope Green light shines light on some of the challenges and responsibilities arising from the current refugee crisis in Europe and throughout the world."

– Olafur Eliasson

TBA21 and Olafur Eliasson are inviting refugees, migrants, and university students to take part in a workshop at TBA21–Augarten, Vienna, together with the gallery’s regular visitors. The workshop involves collaborating to assemble Green light lamp modules designed by Olafur Eliasson, as well as a diverse programme of seminars, performances, screenings, lectures, and artistic interventions organised by TBA21.

Made from recycled and sustainable materials and designed to be stackable, the Green light modules can function either on their own or be combined into more complex structures.

Green Light

2016
Vienna, Austria.

Materials: Wood (European ash), recycled yogurt cups (PLA), used plastic bags, recycled nylon, LED (green)

"Green light is an act of welcoming, addressed both to those who have fled hardship and instability in their home countries and to the residents of Vienna. Working together in a playful creative process, participants build a modular light and construct a communal environment in which difference is not only accepted but embraced. I hope Green light shines light on some of the challenges and responsibilities arising from the current refugee crisis in Europe and throughout the world."

– Olafur Eliasson

TBA21 and Olafur Eliasson are inviting refugees, migrants, and university students to take part in a workshop at TBA21–Augarten, Vienna, together with the gallery’s regular visitors. The workshop involves collaborating to assemble Green light lamp modules designed by Olafur Eliasson, as well as a diverse programme of seminars, performances, screenings, lectures, and artistic interventions organised by TBA21.

Made from recycled and sustainable materials and designed to be stackable, the Green light modules can function either on their own or be combined into more complex structures.

Den Trekantede Himmel

2013
Aalborg, Denmark. 

Materials: Stainless steel, mirror, paint
Dimensions: 364 x 664 x 592 cm 

From the outside, Den trekantede himmel (The triangular sky) appears to be a simple triangular structure held up by three white V-shaped steel supports; on the inside, the work reveals a fragmented view of the sky above the visitors’ heads. This powerful effect is conjured by a simple kaleidoscope; the steel panels that form the work, pragmatic and industrial on the outside, are clad on the inside with smooth mirrors and open to the sky above. Ducking slightly to enter the work, visitors encounter a disorienting amalgam of sky, trees, and the neighbouring building, which was designed by Alvar Aalto to house the Kunsten Museum of Modern Art Aalborg, Denmark.

Den Trekantede Himmel

2013
Aalborg, Denmark.

Materials: Stainless steel, mirror, paint
Dimensions: 364 x 664 x 592 cm 

From the outside, Den trekantede himmel (The triangular sky) appears to be a simple triangular structure held up by three white V-shaped steel supports; on the inside, the work reveals a fragmented view of the sky above the visitors’ heads. This powerful effect is conjured by a simple kaleidoscope; the steel panels that form the work, pragmatic and industrial on the outside, are clad on the inside with smooth mirrors and open to the sky above. Ducking slightly to enter the work, visitors encounter a disorienting amalgam of sky, trees, and the neighbouring building, which was designed by Alvar Aalto to house the Kunsten Museum of Modern Art Aalborg, Denmark.

Den Trekantede Himmel

2013
Aalborg, Denmark.

Materials: Stainless steel, mirror, paint
Dimensions: 364 x 664 x 592 cm 

From the outside, Den trekantede himmel (The triangular sky) appears to be a simple triangular structure held up by three white V-shaped steel supports; on the inside, the work reveals a fragmented view of the sky above the visitors’ heads. This powerful effect is conjured by a simple kaleidoscope; the steel panels that form the work, pragmatic and industrial on the outside, are clad on the inside with smooth mirrors and open to the sky above. Ducking slightly to enter the work, visitors encounter a disorienting amalgam of sky, trees, and the neighbouring building, which was designed by Alvar Aalto to house the Kunsten Museum of Modern Art Aalborg, Denmark.

Vær i vejret

2016
Ordrupgaard, Denmark.

Materials: Bronze, stainless steel, water, pump, nozzles, control unit, wind sensor unit

Vær i vejret takes the form of a large vertical ring positioned along the north-south axis of the Ordrupgaard Kunstpark. A special weathervane mounted on the roof of the museum detects the direction of the wind. Whenever the wind changes direction, the ring emits a gust of fog into the park through a series of thirty-six jets that are spaced equally around the circumference of the ring.
In any work of art displayed outdoors, the weather is the invisible, unspoken element; the artwork is literally exposed to the weather. Whether we acknowledge this fact or not, the weather is always part of the work. The work embraces this invisible element, making the wind, the atmosphere, and the air in which we live explicit. Even when the wind is not blowing, the work exists in a state of potentiality.

Vær i vejret

2016
Ordrupgaard, Denmark.

Materials: Bronze, stainless steel, water, pump, nozzles, control unit, wind sensor unit

Vær i vejret takes the form of a large vertical ring positioned along the north-south axis of the Ordrupgaard Kunstpark. A special weathervane mounted on the roof of the museum detects the direction of the wind. Whenever the wind changes direction, the ring emits a gust of fog into the park through a series of thirty-six jets that are spaced equally around the circumference of the ring.
In any work of art displayed outdoors, the weather is the invisible, unspoken element; the artwork is literally exposed to the weather. Whether we acknowledge this fact or not, the weather is always part of the work. The work embraces this invisible element, making the wind, the atmosphere, and the air in which we live explicit. Even when the wind is not blowing, the work exists in a state of potentiality.

Den Blinde Passager

2010
ARKEN, Museum of Modern Art, Denmark. 

Materials: Fluorescent lights, monofrequency lights (yellow), fog machine, ventilator, wood, aluminum steel, fabric, foil.  

 

Den Blinde Passager

2010
ARKEN, Museum of Modern Art, Denmark. 

Materials: Fluorescent lights, monofrequency lights (yellow), fog machine, ventilator, wood, aluminum steel, fabric, foil.